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Raspberry Pi Whole Home Audio – The Conclusion?

Welcome to what is possibly the concluding post in my Raspberry Whole Home Audio Project series of posts… or possibly not.

At the start of this journey I had a plan to install mopidy on one of my Raspberry Pis and use pulse audio to stream the output to the others. Along the way I ran into some challenges stemming from me buying the cheapest peripherals I could (and subsequently needing to upgrade the WiFi adapters and power cables I first bought to better ones), and my vision evolved as things progressed.

Instead of using mopidy, I switched to installing Kodi on each of the Pis thanks to the OpenElec linux distribution that’s available for several types of hardware, the Pi included.

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How do I join two subnets without the ability to change the default gateway? →

I have a handful of internet-facing Linux (Ubuntu) VPSs with a couple of providers, and I connect them together with a virtual backplane network from ZeroTier (https://www.zerotier.com/). I use thi... — serverfault.com

Anybody know some stuff about Linux and Windows networking and routing and want to help me out?

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The Golden Ratio: Design's Biggest Myth →

The golden ratio is total nonsense in design. Here's why. — fastcodesign.com

The other day I watched a Criminal Minds episode where the BAU rescued some potential victims of a serial killer mathematician by using the golden ratio and the related Fibonacci sequence (or rather, by identifying and understanding the killer’s use of them).

It was an interesting episode. When I decided I wanted to read a little more about the golden ratio I found the article linked above, and that was an interesting read too.

I’ve used the golden ratio in design (indeed, if you’re reading this by visiting my site on a large-screened device then the proportions of the left and right columns match the golden ratio).

Is it more aesthetically pleasing than different proportions would be? That’s the problem with things like this that are said to impact us at a subconscious level, my conscious mind doesn’t know.

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I posted this to shrapnel last weekend as part of my recurring late night links series, but it’s worthy of inclusion here too.
Happy Friday, everyone!
(Source)

I posted this to shrapnel last weekend as part of my recurring late night links series, but it’s worthy of inclusion here too.

Happy Friday, everyone!

(Source)

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WebDAV Woes with Nginx, Sabre/Dav

I’m in the process of moving my hosting to a new server, because I wanted one that offers me more flexibility, and the ability to grow the server and add resources to it during spikes in demand. I’ve chosen to go with Vultr (I recorded a screencast about six weeks ago showing how easy it is to set up a new server on their platform). I’ve also moved some non-essential hosting duties to another provider altogether, CloudAtCost.

Anyway, this is not really my point.

One of the things on the server I’m going to be decommissioning is a private WebDAV store. I don’t use it for much, just moving the occasional file between computers and “publishing” my work Outlook calendar so that I can subsequently synchronize it back to my Google calendar and get notifications on my wrist. It’s the WebDAV server that I’ve been setting up this week.

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Goodnight, first ever VPS.
You’ve served me well, but it’s time to move on to something more powerful and scalable.
Sleep well.

Goodnight, first ever VPS.

You’ve served me well, but it’s time to move on to something more powerful and scalable.

Sleep well.

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How email became the most reviled communication experience ever →

By John PavlusIt wasn't until I heard that a colleague had nuked his personal email account—on purpose, for good—that it hit me: Email is t — engadget.com

This is an interesting read.

At Google I/O in 2009 Google introduced Google Wave, a re-imagining of email. I still maintain this was a much better tool for business communication than email is. The product was killed off only about a year later. Wave had some great technology, but Google failed to even try to sell it to the enterprise. Ultimately the problems Wave solved weren’t technical ones, they were business ones.

That all being said, is the way to solve the current problems with email overload really to replace it with a different tool? I don’t know the solution, but I certainly agree there’s a problem.

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Hacking a Raspberry Pi into a wireless airplay speaker

jordnburgess:

The raspberry pi is fully functional credit card-sized computer that is cheap enough ($25) that it can be used just for a single purpose. With this hack the computer imitates an airplay speaker, making it possible to send songs over to an old stereo wirelessly from your phone.

The Raspberry Pi generated massive hype in nerdy circles this summer when it came out and we’re beginning now to see some amazing hacks from this tiny computer now.

I’ve had mine for a few months now but I hadn’t got around to using it yet. So I’ve now decided to try to make something that I’ve wanted for a while: a product to bring my good but dated speaker system into the 21st century by enabling wireless streaming of music to it.

A possible way to do this would be to buy an Airport Express or an Apple TV and connect the audio out to the stereo. But then I would feel like overpaying for features like video streaming or wireless routing that wouldn’t be used. Besides, those products cost around £80. Airplay enabled speakers cost £200 at the low end. This raspberry pi creation should easily come in under £30.

Here’s a video of it in action.

Keep reading

(Source: jordnburgess)

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Raspberry Pi Whole Home Audio Updates

It’s been a long time since I’ve written about my Raspberry Pi Whole Home Audio Project.

Simply, that’s because I’ve hit a bit of a wall and I’m especially busy with work right now so I haven’t been able to find the time to work my way around it.

The problem is that the USB WiFi adapters that I bought (for about $5 each) don’t perform well. They have signal strength issues, and while they do work and maintain a network connection, the poor signal strength means the connection isn’t fast enough to stream audio. There are plenty of other people out there having the same problem. You get what you pay for, I guess, and I need to buy replacement adapters.

I’m also considering a change in direction. My original plan was to install mopidy on one of the Pis and use pulse audio to stream the output to the others.

I’m considering instead installing TuneBlade on one of my Windows PCs. TuneBlade takes all the audio output from that computer and streams it using Apple’s AirPlay protocol. I’d then install ShairPort on all the Pis to turn them into AirPort receivers.

What do you guys think?

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